DOL News, no. 143, June 2009

Department of Libraries News

 

109 State St., Montpelier, VT  05609 • (802) 828-3261 • www.libraries.vermont.gov
James H. Douglas, Governor  •  Martha Reid, State Librarian
Issue No. 143, June 2009


 
In this issue:

From the State Librarian…

New Titles, Program of Interest

Gates Foundation Opportunity Online Hardware Grants Update

NELINET Members Vote to Join Lyrasis

‘Connecting to Collections’ Project Update

Health Science Librarians Meet with State Librarian

Families Save for College While Four Lucky Libraries Get Cash

Public Libraries to Report 2009 Statistics Online

DOL Renews Contract for Public Performance License

Contributing to the Vermont Union Catalog – a Reminder

Cataloging Gift Books in Libraries

Owney x 4 Visits Libraries and Schools around Vermont

Center for Cartoon Studies Scholarship Awarded

Boston Globe Horn Book Winners Announced

New ‘Old Technology’: Flannel Boards

DCF Ceremony: Kids Give Author Standing Ovation

Green Mountain Book Award Winner Selected

Fall 2009 Materials Review Sessions Scheduled

2009 Certificate of Public Librarianship Recipients

Serial Set Offers Insight into History

Vermont Library People in the News

 

From the State Librarian…

     It was recently suggested to me that the “Vermont way” means holding on to methods we have always used to provide information for our library patrons, even if those methods are outdated. After all -- it’s tradition. Like all of you, I treasure our way of life in Vermont and the elements that make this state so great: small towns, a vital agricultural scene, strong citizen involvement in government, and a community of neighbors. But I don’t agree that Vermonters expect libraries to stand still. Sure, we want to continue to focus on the needs of our local communities and use a high-touch approach with our patrons. Friendly, personal and local service will never go out of style. But Vermont libraries must also embrace new tools and resources. Those of us who work in school, public, academic and special libraries need to know how to use and make available to our patrons a wide assortment of new technologies and digital resources. And we must look into the future with a spirit akin to American pioneers.

     I recently had the pleasure of attending an outstanding conference: Leadership in a Connected Age, sponsored by the Snelling Center for Government and Champlain College. This event brought together Vermonters from business, education, non-profits, and government to look at changes in technology and to discuss our roles as leaders in this ever-changing environment. Keynote speaker Steve Shepard, an international consultant on technology and communications (and a Williston resident), challenged us all to explore and understand the impact and opportunities that come with current and emerging technologies. At the end of the day he left the audience with this observation (I am paraphrasing here) “You may have noticed that there are several librarians here. That’s because libraries are the nexus for the kind of innovative activities that we have talked about today.” You heard it right – libraries are the NEXUS. In case you ever doubted this, libraries can’t afford to be on the sidelines watching others make advances in information technology while we stay put. According to Shepard (and my understanding of the word “nexus”), libraries and librarians are the connectors. We provide the links in the information chain. We are the information core. This is challenging stuff and I am sure there are plenty of people who would disagree with such an assessment. I believe we can live up to the “nexus” standard, but we have a lot of work to do to here in Vermont.  I encourage you to start by tuning in to the conversation that was begun at the Snelling Center conference. Check it out at: http://www.snellingcenter.org/connectedage
                                                        Martha Reid

New Titles, Program of Interest

Marty Reid, State Librarian

     I regularly get calls and emails about new books, media and program ideas. In most cases I haven’t seen these materials, but think they may be of interest to Vermont librarians. I’m passing this information on to you, please note, without any personal endorsement.

Walking Through the Seasons: Observations and Reflections by Marilyn Webb Neagley (Wind Ridge Publishing, 2007, pbk $12.95).
Author Neagley, a resident of Shelburne, won a 2009 Gold Medal from the Independent Publishers Book Awards (IPPY) in NYC for this “best northeastern non-fiction.” Essays and previously published newspaper columns.

Kelly Moore, Music for Mankind
(musician, lecturer, resident of Manchester Center)
In his 45 minute presentation, entitled, “Music For Mankind® - How Can We Help?” Kelly discusses the issues of global hunger, disaster relief, and how Music For Mankind® benefit concerts and Music For Mankind, Inc. is helping with contributions from his events to the UN World Food Program and other humanitarian organizations. Mr. Moore includes 2 short  videos on DVD and a Question and Answer session during his presentation. http://www.musicformankind.net/about/speaking_engagements.htm

What the Abenaki Say About Dogs, and other Poems and Stories of Lake Champlain by Dan Close. (Resident of Underhill, Vermont)  Contact email: 11highmeadow@comcast.net

Lifting the Yoke; Local Solutions to America’s Farm and Food Issues by Rob Krupp. Krupp, a resident of South Burlington, is a well-known gardening guru, VPR commentator, and author of The Woodchuck’s Guide to Gardening. His new book focuses on sustainable food and farm issues in Vermont. He is also known for his presentations at libraries around the state. For one of his upcoming events:  http://galaxy.indiebound.com/event/ron-krupp-presented-buffalo-mountain-food-co-op

Rick and the Ramblers, Western Swing Band.  Rick Norcross celebrated his 45th year in the music business with the release (last fall) of his band’s newest CD: I Rode the Ti; Songs from the Heart of Vermont. For more information, or to book a concert at your library: www.rickandtheramblers.com. My special thanks to Rick for donating 50 copies of the CD for DOL to give to libraries at the Vermont Library Conference. 

 

Gates Foundation Opportunity Online Hardware Grants Update

Michael Roche, Regional Consultant

     For those libraries who have committed to participating in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Opportunity Online Hardware Grant Program, NELINET has filed (on behalf of the Department of Libraries) our state’s grant proposal for final approval. Candidate libraries should hear official word regarding the grant approval in the near future. The Gates Foundation requests that grant recipients not make any formal announcement until they release their own official press statement.  DOL will provide you with details once the grant is approved.

     Once the grant is approved DOL will be holding additional information sessions to give libraries a better understanding of the grant program and its related responsibilities and commitments. If you have additional questions about the grant, please contact:

            Stephen Sanzo

Program Manager for the Opportunity Online Hardware Grant Program

NELINET, Inc.

508-597-1948 / Email: sanzo@nelinet.net 

       or 

Michael Roche, Regional Library Consultant

Northeast Regional Library

            802-748-3428 / michael.roche@mail.dol.state.vt.us

 

NELINET Members Vote to Join Lyrasis

Marty Reid, State Librarian

     NELINET and Lyrasis (created from the merger of PALINET and SOLINET) have overwhelmingly approved the resolution for NELINET to join Lyrasis with a “YES” vote of over 94%. Together, Lyrasis and NELINET will comprise the largest membership collaborative of its kind, serving librarians and information professionals in New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the Southeastern United States. The expanded membership now includes libraries and cultural heritage institutions in 22 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

     Kate Nevins is the Chief Executive Officer of Lyrasis and NELINET Executive Director Arnold Hirshon will be taking on a new role as Chief Strategist and Principal Consultant. Plans are for NELINET to be fully integrated into Lyrasis by Fall 2009.

     The Department of Libraries is one of many Vermont library NELINET members and reminds Vermont public libraries that they are eligible for some benefits via the DOL membership. Member benefits include: savings opportunities on a variety of products (including online and electronic resources) and access to a variety of workshops and conferences at reduced cost.  For more information: http://www3.nelinet.net/ and http://www.lyrasis.org/ .

 

‘Connecting to Collections’ Project Update

Marty Reid, State Librarian

     Bob Joly, Director of the Woodbury Community Library and Reference Librarian at the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, represented Vermont at the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) forum, "Stewardship of America’s Legacy: Answering the Call to Action," held June 16 -17 in Buffalo, New York. The forum brought together front-line leaders in the movement to save America’s collections for future generations. Conference participants left with concrete information and fresh inspiration for maintaining the health of our nation’s library collections. Bob’s attendance at this conference is part of the IMLS “Connecting to Collections” project.

     Some 80 Vermonters, including librarians from public and academic libraries, gathered in Montpelier on June 24 at the “Connecting to Collections Summit” to discuss the results of the survey sent out to libraries and other institutions and to consider future projects for preserving Vermont book, public records and cultural heritage collections in libraries, museums, historical societies, and town offices. The Department of Libraries joined the Vermont Historical Society and other Vermont organizations in this IMLS grant-funded project. For more information and a copy of the complete report see the project page on the VHS website

Health Science Librarians Meet with State Librarian

Marty Reid, State Librarian 

     State Librarian Marty Reid met in June with health science librarians Jessie Casella (Brattleboro Memorial Hospital), Claire LaForce (Rutland Regional Medical Center) and Marianne Burke (Dana Medical Library, University of Vermont) to explore ideas for collaboration with DOL and with other Vermont libraries – public, academic, and special.  

     ALL agreed that similar challenges face both public and medical libraries:

  • Perception that the Internet replaces library resources
  • Lack of awareness of librarian skill sets, including expert online searching
  • Need to market resources and services
  • Budget and staff shortages

      These resources are a starting place for librarians for access to health and medical information (In addition to the Gale Health and Wellness Resource Center in the Vermont Online Library): 

1. National Library of Medicine: start here for all the resources the NLM offers, both to the public and to librarians: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/   NLM has free resources in the areas of public health work, disaster and pandemic information, and environmental health resources, topics that are a good “bridge” between the public library and medical library sector as they are of interest to the general public as well as health professionals. 

2. Check out the last bullet on the left side of the page for the “Network of Medical Libraries”: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/network.html. Vermont is in Region 8.

3. To learn about the network of Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) in Vermont and the U.S: http://www.med.uvm.edu/ahec/TB8+BL+I.asp?SiteAreaID=91

Summer Program Helps Families Save for College While Four Lucky Libraries Get Cash

Grace Greene, Youth Services Consultant

     DOL is pleased to announce a partnership with the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC) and the Vermont Higher Education Investment Plan (VHEIP) to present a statewide promotion entitled:  “Get Creative @ Saving for College!” 

     This program encourages parents to sign up their children for their public library’s summer reading program, and provides an incentive to motivate them to do so. The Get Creative @ Saving for College promotion gives parents a chance to win a $1,000 check prize that they can use toward their child’s future college education and helps families become aware of the need and opportunities to start saving for college today. As an added bonus, the library where the winning parent signed up for the promotion will win a $500 check prize. There will be four $1,000 prizes for families and, therefore, four libraries will receive a $500 prize, too. In addition, there will be four programs that VHEIP pays for in four locations around the state. These programs will feature entertainment for families and an award ceremony for prize winners.

     Very soon libraries will receive all of the materials needed to participate. VSAC will mail directly to your library: entry forms, posters, brochures and bookmarks. Libraries will display these and encourage parents to fill out the entry cards. The cards are postage-paid, so libraries only need to drop them in the mail.

     This is truly a win/win program. Libraries get extra publicity for their summer programs; families get information about saving for college and the chance to win a prize, and your library may win a prize! By the way, librarians can reassure families that they will not receive any further information in the mail unless they specifically request it by checking off a box on the entry form. Good luck!

 

Public Libraries to Report 2009 Statistics Online

Rob Geiszler, Regional Consultant

     The Department of Libraries has come to an agreement with Baker and Taylor, Inc. to collect our annual public library statistics report and standards applications online, using B&T’s product called Bibliostat Collect. This means that beginning this fall, libraries will no longer print and mail their Public Library Report and Standards Application to the DOL. Instead, libraries will receive a login and password on a secure website and will answer all the questions online. Libraries will be able to print and archive a copy of the report or application, for internal use only. Good news! Public libraries will not have to mail anything to DOL.

     Here are some of the advantages for libraries:

  • No trip to the post office or mailing costs

  • A blank copy of the form can be printed in advance to allow librarians to assemble data

  • Identifying information (Name, Address, Telephone, Librarian, etc) will be pre-filled 

  • Last year’s data will be visible, as librarians enter new information

  • Edit checks will catch obvious mistakes

  • Calculations will be performed automatically: no arithmetic mistakes

  • Data will be accurately reported; no mistakes in data re-entry by DOL

  • Print out the forms for local library records

  • Download an electronic copy of local data (in EXCEL format)

      DOL will offer training sessions in the fall to prepare librarians for using this product. In addition, DOL regional consultants will be glad to assist libraries in uploading information. 

 

DOL Renews Contract for Public Performance License

Amy Howlett, Regional Consultant

     Movie Licensing USA will again cover movie showings in Vermont public libraries. Public libraries must send in a signed agreement form in order to take advantage of this free offer. The form is available at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/movielicense. The new contract covers the period of June 1, 2009 – May 31, 2010.

     The license covers Hollywood studios listed on the agreement form. Libraries can also use the online search box at http://www.movlic.com to verify that particular movies are covered by the license, to generate free posters with the original movie art, and to get great programming ideas. 

     Libraries have been asking about showing the teen blockbuster Twilight, based on the popular vampire novel by Stephenie Meyer. Movie Licensing USA does not cover this film with the regular license, but libraries may purchase a one-time event license for $100 per showing. Full information is online at: http://www.movlic.com/library/twilight.html .

     The summer reading program theme, Be Creative, is perfect for movies. Use suggestions from http://www.movlic.com/library/summer.html to offer musical, literary, or dramatic films. For adults, consider a classic series based on the Marx Brothers or Jimmy Stewart. Both were big hits in Hartland this spring.

 

Contributing to the Vermont Union Catalog – a Reminder

Lorraine Lanius, Technical Services Librarian

   The Technical Services Unit staff is requesting as much information as possible when libraries report holdings because it is difficult to find records with limited information (i.e. only authors and titles). In order to ensure accurate matches of MARC records in PUBCAT with public library reports of VUC holdings, automated libraries should try to send to TSU the following information about each title (the same information requested on the Card/MARC request slips).:

  • ISBN

  • LCCN (Library of Congress Control number)

  • author’s last and first name

  • title

  • publisher

  • latest publication date

  • edition

  • OCLC and VUC holding codes (If you want to use only one code we prefer OCLC codes, but you may use your VUC symbol if your library doesn’t have an OCLC symbol)

  • format (CD, DVD, videocassette, cassette tape) and the number of items (exp. 3 CDs or 5 videocassettes) 

     To save your library’s time, we do not need library call numbers or barcode numbers.

     For questions about contributing library holdings, please refer to the Technical Services Home Page at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/tsu/vuchome, or contact Lorraine Lanius (lorraine.lanius@mail.dol.state.vt.us / 802-828-3261).

 

Cataloging Gift Books in Libraries

Lorraine Lanius, Technical Services Librarian 

     When your library receives gift books, DVDs, CDs or other items that are part of a mass distribution to libraries throughout the state, you will need to decide if you want to add the item to your collection. The generous donors of these items usually aren’t thinking about the cataloging needs of libraries; they are merely concerned with helping the libraries, promoting their items and causes, or helping to foster public awareness. For cataloging, kindly get in touch with Lorraine Lanius of the Technical Services Unit instead of the donor. Lorraine will make arrangements to catalog the item and add a MARC record to one of the VALS databases. Thanks for your cooperation.

 

Owney x 4 Visits Libraries and Schools around Vermont

Grace Greene, Youth Services Consultant

    We are the lucky owners of four plush “Owneys,” the dog featured in the Red Clover nominee, Owney, the Mail-Pouch Pooch (FSG, 2008). Two of the animals were donated by the author, Mona Kerby, and the Vermont Center for the Book purchased the others. Because the real Owney traveled all over the country, and later the world, we are sending these dogs on a trip, too -- but just in Vermont. These Owneys will be travelling among schools and public libraries around the state. Each library or school that is interested will get Owney for approximately one week. We will mail to you Owney and a journal. Please make a tag for Owney to wear, and attach it to his coat. Also write an entry in the journal to say what Owney did while he was visiting your library or school. Then send the whole package on to another library as listed in your packet.

     If your library would like to host Owney this year (June, 2009—July, 2010), please send a request to April Kelley at cbec@mail.dol.state.vt.us . Include your name, the name of your institution and your mailing address. She will let you know when Owney will be arriving in your town. The Owneys are very excited about getting to know Vermont!

 

Center for Cartoon Studies Scholarship Awarded

Grace Greene, Youth Services Consultant

     We have a winner! In a random drawing from all of the entries submitted, we have chosen Danielle Brooke, age 16, from the Chelsea Public School, to be the winner of the scholarship for a one-week cartooning workshop at the Center for Cartoon Studies this summer. Danielle, who is just finishing up her sophomore year, is an excellent student who would like to pursue art as a career, and is excited to have the opportunity to explore cartoon studies. Congratulations, Danielle!

     The Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, the generous donor of the scholarship, is also donating four books to Danielle’s library. Maria Lamson, the Chelsea school librarian, will be awarded these titles: Houdini: The Handcuff King by Jason Lutes & Nick Bertozzi; Satchel Paige: Striking Out Jim Crow by James Sturm & Rich Tommaso; Thoreau at Walden by John Porcellino; and Adventures in Cartooning: How to Turn Your Doodles Into Comics by James Sturm, Andrew Arnold & Alexis Frederick-Frost.

     For more information about this fabulous resource in our very own state, please see: www.cartoonstudies.org .

 

Boston Globe Horn Book Winners Announced

Grace Greene, Youth Services Consultant

     The prestigious Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards for excellence in children’s literature were announced earlier this month, with top honors going to: Nation by Terry Pratchett (fiction); The Lincolns: A Scrapbook Look at Abraham and Mary by Candace Fleming (nonfiction) and Bubble Trouble by Margaret Mahy, illustrated by Polly Dunbar (picture book). For a full listing, please see:  http://www.hbook.com/bghb/current.asp .

 

New ‘Old Technology’: Flannel Boards

Grace Greene, Youth Services Consultant

     As new technologies increase at an exponential blur, sometimes a person needs a dose of some good old fashioned storytelling, and flannel boards are just the thing. My fabulous assistant April Kelley has created some new flannel boards in her spare time, and there are six new ones waiting to go:

Chicken Little

Five Little Ghosts

Five Little Monkeys

Five Little Pumpkins

Five Red Apples

The Three Little Pigs 

     Each kit contains the cut-out figures and either a book or a script. These new titles bring us up to a total of 25 flannel boards. Libraries can request them via ILL as any other material; check under keyword “flannelboard” for a full listing. 

     Never done this kind of storytelling? It’s easy, but requires some practice. Borrow one of our books on storytelling with flannel boards, and to find all the tips you need.

 

DCF Ceremony: Kids Give Author Standing Ovation

Grace Greene, Youth Services Consultant

     Jeff Kinney won the 2009 Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) Award for Diary of a Wimpy Kid (Amulet, 2007), a very funny and insanely popular book (first of a series). Though he was not able to come to Vermont to accept his award, we were very fortunate to hear from another author who also had a very popular book on the 2008-2009 DCF master list. That author is Linda Urban, who lives in East Montpelier and wrote the book A Crooked Kind of Perfect, the story of a girl who is forced, because of her father’s quirky purchase, to change her ambition from being a pianist good enough to play in Carnegie Hall to playing a Perfectone D-60 organ at the Perfectone Perform-O-Rama.

     Linda delivered one of the best DCF speeches that any of us had ever heard. She had the whole hall (approximately 450 students, teachers and librarians) in the palm of her hand. Through asking the children questions and getting them to think about a special goal they may have, she had them relate both to the character in her book and to her own writing goals. In a move that I don’t remember seeing at any previous ceremony children rose up spontaneously to give her a standing ovation!

     DCF Bookmarks:  This year we have two bookmarks, both downloadable:  (1) with all 30 nominees for the 2009-2010 award, and (2) a listing of all the winners from the beginning of the program. Find them at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/dcf .

 

Green Mountain Book Award Winner Selected

Grace Greene, Youth Services Consultant

     The winner of the 2009 GMBA Award is Ellen Hopkins for Crank (McElderry, 2004). This semi-autobiographical novel in verse recounts the downward spiral of a “good girl” who is introduced to drugs when on a visit to her father. When she returns home, she is unable to shake “the monster,” and soon finds her grades plummeting and her entire life centering on her drug use. The ending gives no easy solution and no guarantee that she will ever be drug-free. Teenagers across the state found the book both riveting and horrifying, especially when they discovered that the main character is based on the author’s daughter.

     For a list of this year’s nominees, the accompanying booklet and downloadable bookmarks, see: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/gmba .

 

Fall 2009 Materials Review Sessions Scheduled

Grace Greene, Youth Services Consultant

     If you select children’s or young adult books for your library, come preview the books first before you spend your money. DOL’s Materials Review Sessions feature oral reviews of approximately 75 titles and the opportunity to examine hundreds of other books recommended either by our volunteer reviewers or by the review media. All have reviews inserted in them to help you with purchase decisions.  

     This fall there will be two “live” sessions of Materials Review, and three sessions on DVD. Live sessions will be held in Northfield and Killington. RETN (Regional Educational Technology Network) will record the Northfield presentation, and that recording will be shown in three other locations. The books, with the reviews inserted in them, will accompany the DVD, so whichever site you choose you will have access to all the books. The schedule is as follows:

Wednesday, October 28      Brown Public Library, Northfield                  LIVE!

Thursday, October 29           Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington      LIVE!

Wednesday, Nov. 4              Milton Public Library

Friday, November 6              Northeast Regional Library, St. Johnsbury

Thursday, Nov. 12                 Kurn Hattin, Westminster

     All programs begin at 9:00 a.m. Following the formal part of the program there will be plenty of time to examine the books.

 

2009 Certificate of Public Librarianship Recipients

Mara Siegel, Continuing Education Coordinator

     The Vermont Department of Libraries established a Public Library Certification Program primarily for Vermont public library directors who do not have formal library training. Other library staff may pursue certification as workshop space allows. To earn a “Certificate of Public Librarianship,” participants must successfully complete 150 credits by taking workshops offered by the Department of Libraries or by taking approved courses relating to public library service provided by other organizations, institutions, or agencies.

     On May 12, six librarians were awarded Certificates of Public Librarianship at the Vermont Library Conference. The Department congratulates them for all of their hard work and dedication. They are:

Tammy Hunt, Brown Public Library, Northfield
Carolyn Meagher, Hancock Free Library
Linda Reeves, Gilbert Hart Library, Wallingford
Betsy Smith, formerly of the Peacham Public Library
Kristine Sweeter, Whitingham Free Public Library
Dawn Thibault, Russell Memorial Library, Monkton

 

Serial Set Offers Insight into History

Paul Donovan, Reference & Law Librarian

     Revolutionaries throughout history have often adopted noms-de-guerre to imbue their activities with some kind of credibility and stature.  In 1973, Donald DeFreeze, leader of the San Francisco-based Symbionese Liberation Army (which kidnapped and recruited publishing heiress Patty Hearst) adopted the name Cinque, after the leader of the revolt aboard the slave ship La Amistad in 1839.  “Field Marshall Cinque” may lack a certain revolutionary cache, but it may have been the best choice of names from the group which seized control of the ship; among the other options were: Field Marshall Tooch, Field Marshall Fawnie, Field Marshall Berrie, or Field Marshall Yahboy – all clearly unsuitable for the leader of a “revolutionary vanguard army”.

     Where would a budding Field Marshall get a list of La Amistad slave names from which to choose? It is possible he obtained the list from U.S. House of Representatives Executive Document 185, from the 26th Congress, 1st Session.  But I doubt it; Executive Document 185 is part of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set, a bound series of over 14,000 sequentially-numbered volumes which contains nearly all of the hundreds of thousands of numbered congressional reports and documents published since 1817. Locating Executive Doc 185 would pose a challenge to any Field Marshall without a librarian on staff.

     The Serial Set, as it is commonly known, is used primarily by those doing federal legislative history research, but it contains other gems as well as the documents surrounding the seizure of La Amistad. It contains, for instance, the text of the Louisiana Purchase Treaty, where DeFreeze would’ve learned about the acquisition of his home state of California (American State Papers, v. 2 - part of the Serial Set).  He also might’ve learned about faith, hope and charity from Thomas Jefferson’s translation of the Bible from Greek, Latin, French and English sources – despite the fact that Jefferson left out mysterious and miraculous events including the Virgin Birth and the Resurrection. Lessons about the importance of patience, nonviolence, and resolve in the face of defeat can be gleaned from some of the documents concerning the women’s rights movement, such as the reports on the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote. The Serial Set contains the hearings from 1880, 1884 and. Arguments against suffrage are in Senate documents from the subsequent Session. 

     Suffrage passed, but the Equal Rights Amendment was not as fortunate. Introduced into every Congress between 1923 and 1972, it was passed by Congress and sent to the States in an unsuccessful attempt at ratification. The story is in Senate Report 92-689, 92nd Congress, 2nd Session.

     Other sad episodes are detailed in the Serial Set. The Treaty of New Echota, signed in 1835, allowed the U.S. government to export the Cherokee of Georgia to Oklahoma, resulting in the deaths of 4000 Cherokee on the “Trail of Tears” (Senate Document 512, 23rd Congress, 1st Session) – despite the petition by the citizens of Dorset (Vermont) praying that the Treaty not be enforced (Senate Document 416, 25th Congress, 2nd Session).

     Vermonters made their voices heard on other matters as well. On a number of occasions, Vermonters objected strenuously to the practice of slavery, particularly in regard to the admission of slave-holding States to the Union. Of course, slave-holding States responded. Alabama certainly did, in Senate Miscellaneous Document 85, 30th Congress, 1st Session, stating, “…whist Alabama refuses to be fickle upon a subject of so much importance to the honor of nations, Vermont may.” Vermonters also petitioned that Congress propose the establishment of a congress of nations for the adjustment of international disputes in 1938 (Senate Document 307, 25th Congress, 2nd Session).

     Other documents of interest in the Serial Set include reports from the Lewis and Clark expedition, Commodore Perry’s report on his journeys to Japan, the investigation of the Pearl Harbor, two pages of Thomas Edison’s patents and Eli Whitney’s letter requesting an extension on his patent of the cotton, the Titanic investigation, the petition by Susan B. Anthony for remission of the fine imposed on her for voting, and the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002.

     “The amount of human endeavor recorded in the Serial Set for surpasses that recorded in any other single writing or collection”, according to Suzanne DeLong. “It records the scientific, social, economic, political, military, and cultural growth of the nation through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It contains reports of the land and sea explorations…surveys of the coast of the United States…information on the peoples, plants, animals, and geological and cultural artifacts found…patent reports, reports of the Smithsonian Institution, reports on mineral and other natural resources, and health studies on diseases. The commerce of the nation is reported in the development of roads, canals, railroads and navigation…[T]he demographic portrait of society is recorded in a myriad of statistical reports…[T]he fine arts are represented with reports on architecture, sculpture, music and painting.”

     The Vermont Department of Libraries has been exchanging documents with the federal government since the early 1800s, and has nearly all of these documents. Whether you’re a Field Marshall or field hand, there’s something that’s bound to interest you in the Serial Set!  

 

Vermont Library People in the News 

Paul Carnahan, Vermont Historical Society Library, and Bill Fish, are authors of Montpelier: Images of Vermont's Capital City (The History Press, 2008). The book features “Montpelier's citizens in their grittiest, saddest, happiest and most triumphant moments.”

Ginger Gellman, Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester is author of a new book, Historic Photos of Vermont (Turner, 2009). Photos and text show that “Vermonters have shown great creativity and adaptability in preserving the past while admitting the new.”

Barbara Shatara, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, will have two articles published in an ALA Press publication later this year. Librarians as Community Partners: an Outreach Handbook, edited by Carol Smallwood, will include Shatara’s “Laptop Literacy: Language and Computer Literacy Services to Refugees in Burlington, Vermont” and “The Long Journey to Vermont: Immigration, Cultural Identity and Book Discussions that Build Community.” The Department of Libraries will add this title to its Library Science Collection, making it available through interlibrary loan.

 


Department of Libraries, 109 State Street, Montpelier, VT 05609-0601

Martha Reid, State Librarian: martha.reid@mail.dol.state.vt.us  802-828-3265

Library and Information Services Division 802-828-3261
Paul Donovan, Law Librarian: paul.donovan@mail.dol.state.vt.us
Gerrie Denison, Reference & ILL Librarian: gerrie.denison@mail.dol.state.vt.us
Lorraine Lanius, Head, Technical Services Unit:  lorraine.lanius@mail.dol.state.vt.us
Mara Siegel, DOL-UVM Access Office Librarian/Continuing Education Librarian: mara.siegel@mail.dol.state.vt.us
Teresa Faust, Special Services Consultant: 802-828-3273, teresa.faust@mail.dol.state.vt.us

Public Library Support Services Division
Grace W. Greene, Children's Services Consultant:  802-828-6954, grace.greene@mail.dol.state.vt.us
Amy Howlett, Regional Consultant: 802-463-0142, amy.howlett@mail.dol.state.vt.us
Robert Geiszler, Regional Consultant: 802-786-3839, rob.geiszler@mail.dol.state.vt.us
Jeremiah Kellogg, Regional Consultant/Midstate Regional Librarian: 802-828-2320, jeremiah.kellogg@mail.dol.state.vt.us
Michael Roche, Regional Consultant/Northeast Regional Librarian: 802-748-3428, michael.roche@mail.dol.state.vt.us

Vermont Automated Libraries System: 802-828-6952
Sheila M. Kearns, Information Technology Manager: sheila.kearns@mail.dol.state.vt.us

News is published by the Vermont Department of Libraries and is distributed to all Vermont libraries, trustee chairs, state legislators, and others who care about Vermont libraries. News is available in alternate formats upon request. News is supported in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal agency, through the Library Services and Technology Act.   
Editor: Teresa R. Faust , 802.828.3273,
teresa.faust@mail.dol.state.vt.us